The Arts
Highlights from the Art Institute of Chicago
June 22, 2017
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Highlights from the Art Institute of Chicago | Duende by Madam ZoZo

It’s almost impossible to select a favourite piece from the Chicago Institute of Art. I would need a decade to gaze lovingly into the eyes of each portrait, wander the varied landscapes and dream up a home where I could welcome each exquisitely crafted piece of furniture and decorative item on display. While I’m inevitably drawn to the colours of Matisse, and wooed by Picasso’s geometry, I discovered a number of new artists to flirt with in the Institute’s halls. These highlights from the Art Institute of Chicago include some familiar artists and artworks, along with lesser known works by Russian avant-garde artist Nathalija Gontcharova, French sculptor Charles-Henri-Joseph Cordier and Norwegian landscape artist Thomas Fearnley. Here are my highlights of the Art Institute of Chicago – minus any textiles, which I heartbreakingly ran out of time for.

Landscape at L'Estaque - Braque | Highlights from the Art Institute of Chicago | Duende by Madam ZoZo
Landscape at L'Estaque - Georges Braque (1906)
Jeanne d'Arc - Mercié | Highlights from the Art Institute of Chicago | Duende by Madam ZoZo
Jeanne d'Arc - Antonin Mercié (1875/1900)

Above: Oil on Canvas, Landscape at L’Estaque, is one of Georges Braque’s early works as he was coming to the end of his Fauvist period in 1907. A visit to Pablo Picasso’s studio in the same year sparked a change of style which put Braque at the forefront of cubism. In fact, the term “Cubism,” was coined when French art critic, Louis Vauxcelles, described Braque’s work as “bizarreries cubiques.”

Left: A young and defiant Joan of Arc in gilt bronze, by Antonin Mercié.

Below: An Art Nouveau cabinet, made of walnut with gilt bronze and glass, by Lois-Désire-Eugéne Gaillard of France. The cabinet was once part of a dining room suite.

Display Cabinet - France 1900 | Highlights from the Art Institute of Chicago | Duende by Madam ZoZo
Display Cabinet, manufactured in France c. 1900

Right: Henri Matisse painted this post-impressionist still life, Apples, in 1916.

 

Below: Nightlife was painted by Chicago local, Archibald Motley Jr. The artist depicts African American culture in the context of a lively dance hall scene situated in Chicago’s Bronzeville neighbourhood. Motley was inspired by Edward Hopper’s Nighthawks (also pictured below), which had been added to the Art Institute of Chicago’s collection the year before.

Apples - Matisse | Highlights from the Art Institute of Chicago | Duende by Madam ZoZo
Apples - Henri Matisse (1916)
Nightlife - Motley
Nightlife - Archibald J. Motley Jr (1943)
Nighthawks - Hopper | Duende by Madam ZoZo
Nighthawks - Edward Hopper (1942)
The Red Armchair - Picasso | Highlights from the Art Institute of Chicago | Duende by Madam ZoZo
The Red Armchair - Pablo Picasso (1931)

Left: Pablo Picasso’s, The Red Armchair, was the first in a series of paintings that depicted his mistress of the time, Marie-Thérèse Walter. Picasso used industrial house paint known as Ripolin, mixed with oil paint, to create various textures. An example is the smooth black lines with barely perceptible brushstrokes.

Below: I’m sure I’m not the only one who was introduced to Arrangement in Grey and Black No. I, more commonly referred to as Whistler’s Mother, by Mr Bean. The painting is usually exhibited by the Musée d’Orsay in Paris, however we were fortunate enough to catch the portrait of Anna McNeill Whistler, as she was passing through Chicago. In 1863 Mrs Whistler relocated from her homeland in the U.S. to be with her son, artist James, in London. Eight years later he asked her to pose for this portrait, which he considered one of his finest works.

Arrangement in Grey and Black No. 1 (aka Whistler's Mother) | Highlights from the Art Institute of Chicago | Duende by Madam ZoZo
Arrangement in Grey and Black No. I (Portrait of the Artist's Mother) - James McNeill Whistler (1871)
Pergola with Oranges - Fearnley | Highlights from the Art Institute of Chicago | Duende by Madam ZoZo
Pergola with Oranges - Thomas Fearnley (c. 1834)

Above: Norwegian, Thomas Fearnley, painted the Italian scene Pergola with Oranges, circa 1834. During this decade he travelled extensively throughout Europe, and spent three years based in Italy during which he created this oil on paper.

 

Right: Bust of an African Woman, was sculpted in 1851 by Frenchman Charles-Henri-Joseph Cordier. The bust was well-received upon its initial display at the 1848 Paris Salon, despite images of African people having rarely been publically exhibited at the time.

Bust of an African Woman - Cordier | Highlights from the Art Institute of Chicago | Duende by Madam ZoZo
Bust of an African Woman - Charles-Henri-Joseph Cordier (1851)
Table Centrepiece - Gastecloux | Highlights from the Art Institute of Chicago | Duende by Madam ZoZo
Table centrepiece - Denis René Gastecloux (1768)

Above: There is no doubt in my mind that this golden palace table centrepiece has inspired more than one wannabe Disney Princess. The 3-story building or garden pavilion was cast in bronze in 1768, and inscribed with the name Gastecloux. The name has been tentatively linked to casters, engravers and bronze workers in Paris, London and Saint Petersburg during the 18th century.

Londonderry Vase
Londonderry Vase - Charles Percier et al (1813)

Left: Londonderry Vase is the product of a collaboration between a designer, decorator, two painters and an unknown number of ceramicists. This monumental vase was commissioned by Napoleon himself around 1805. The vase was finally released from the Sèvres Porcelain Manufactory in 1814, after his exile. It became a diplomatic gift from King Louis XVIII to English foreign secretary, Viscount Castlereagh, second Marquis of Londonderry.

Fireplace surround | Highlights from the Art Institute of Chicago | Duende by Madam ZoZo
Fireplace Surround - George Washington Maher and Louis J. Millet (1901)

Above: This glass mosaic fireplace surround is the design of George Washington Maher and made by Louis J. Millet. Maher, an American Prairie School architect, is known for having used signature motifs to unite the interior and exterior of the homes he designed. He based these decorative details on local natural elements.

Right: The Tree of Life Window was designed by architect Frank Lloyd Wright and manufactured by the Linden Glass Company for the Darwin D. Martin House. Wright’s geometric pattern of rectangles and inverted v-shapes, known as Chevron, form a stylised tree of life.

Tree of Life Window - Wright | Highlights from the Art Institute of Chicago | Duende by Madam ZoZo
Tree of Life Window - Frank Lloyd Wright (1904)

Below: Georges Seurat created 28 drawings, 28 panels and 3 canvases in preparation for the final A Sunday on La Grande Jatte. A wonderful reminder that Rome wasn’t built in a day. Twenty-six year old Seurat debuted La Grande Jatte publically for the first time at the final Impressionist exhibition in May 1886. It was quite the scandal, as the painting marked the transition of Impressionism into Neo-Impressionism, a movement later renamed to “pointillism.” Instead of mixing colours on canvas as the traditional Impressionists like Monet did, pointillists dabbed small blocks of colour next to each other on the canvas, creating a mosaic-like surface of shimmering colour.

A Sunday on La Grande Jatte - Seurat | Highlights from the Art Institute of Chicago | Duende by Madam ZoZo
A Sunday on La Grande Jatte - Georges Seurat (1884)
American Windows - Chagall | Highlights from the Art Institute of Chicago | Duende by Madam ZoZo
American Windows - Marc Chagall (1977)

Above: The American Windows, are the work of Russian-born modernist Marc Chagall.  After the enthusiastic reception of his Four Seasons mosaic, installed outside Chase Tower in Chicago during the early 1970’s, Chagall was drawn back to the Windy City. Supported by The Art Institute, he created six panels of stained glass to celebrate the American Bicentennial and the U.S. as a place of cultural and religious freedom.

Spanish Dancer | Highlights from the Art Institute of Chicago | Duende by Madam ZoZo
Spanish Dancer - Nathalie Gontcharova (1916)

Left: This is Duende, so there was no passing by this Spanish Dancer with her white lace and fan, the creation of Russian avant-garde artist Nathalija Gontcharova.

 

Below: The Weaver, is a Diego Rivera tempera and oil on canvas, painted in 1936. The Mexican artist regularly painted indigenous themes, calling to attention political and social injustices. Weaver Luz Jiménez is pictured working on a backstrap loom, a centries-old tradition in Mexican culture.

The Weaver - Rivera | Highlights from the Art Institute of Chicago | Duende by Madam ZoZo
The Weaver - Diego Rivera

I hope you found a few new artists to love in these highlights of the the Art Institute of Chicago. If you want more art, see Art Highlights of New York City and Indianapolis.

Peace, love and inspiring travel,

Madam ZoZo

Highlights from the Art Institute of Chicago | Duende by Madam ZoZo

About author

Madam ZoZo

Hi! I'm Madam ZoZo, aka Zoë, an Australian designer, creative consultant, blogger and digital nomad. I'm passionate about travel, design, dance and new experiences that fuel my creativity. I strive to travel in a style that is gentle on the earth and that contributes to the communities I visits, even if it is merely to take away a greater understanding of a different culture. Duende by Madam ZoZo, is where I share the stories of my travels and the duende (soul/inspiration) I find along the way.

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