Architecture Design
Greenwood Great House – Jamaica’s Best Kept Secret
April 17, 2018
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Greenwood Great House, Jamaica

I had to do some mining for hidden Jamaican gems before I came across Greenwood Great House. I visited on good authority that the home’s original condition and furnishings make it a more interesting choice than other, better known great houses on the island. I was suitably impressed!

Greenwood was built in 1780 by Richard Barrett, cousin of famous British poet Elizabeth “How Do I Love Thee?” Browning (nee Barrett), and their family synonymous with Wimpole Street, London. It’s one of the best preserved great homes in Jamaica, exhibiting a fascinating history, beautiful interiors, a wealth of artifacts and quality antiques. If you’re a history buff or interiors addict like I am, you’ll delight in Greenwood’s museum-worth of furnishings and objets d’art.

What is a great house?

A great house is a large home or mansion. In Jamaica, the term refers to 18th– and 19th-century homes that were constructed and used by plantation owners in the height of the sugar and slave era. They were often two stories, the lower of brick, stone and mortar and an upper level of wood, and positioned on high ground to invite cool breezes and avoid diseases. Many of the original great houses were burnt to the ground during the slave rebellion of 1831-32. Almost 50 great houses survive, ranging in condition from ruins to completely restored.

The Barrett Family

The first Barrett to arrive in Jamaica was Hersey Barrett, who was an officer in the unsuccessful raid of Hispaniola (contemporary Haiti and the Dominican Republic) in 1655. Defeated in Hispaniola, the British decided to try their luck taking Jamaica from the Spaniards and won. Hersey Barrett was granted land and settled into growing a sugar empire. In a short time, the Barrett patriarch became very wealthy amassing 84,000 acres of land and 2,000 slaves. The Barrett family resided at nearby Barrett Hall, but also owned Cinnamon Hill Great House and a place in London as well. Greenwood Great House was built merely for entertaining, when cousin Richard Barrett became speaker of the House of Assembly and supervisor of St. James Parish. Richard was the only Barrett to remain in Jamaica once slave trade was abolished and the bottom fell out of the sugar industry.

Greenwood Great House

Greenwood Great House has been occupied continuously since it was built, and therefore is one of the mansions that boasts a high degree of originality in structure and furnishings. Approximately eighty percent of the furnishings and artifacts that can be seen inside the home were found onsite by the current owners Thomas “Bob” and Ann Betton. The rest are historically accurate for the era in which the Barretts would have resided in the house. The Bettons purchased the property in 1975 and have applied a lot of love in restoring, maintaining and showcasing the gorgeous property.

I asked our guide Patricia about hurricane damage, and she noted that the worst damage was sustained in 1988 when the front verandah was torn off and found deposited in the carpark at the rear of the home. This seems to me very fortunate given the prominent hillside position that Greenwood takes at the border of St. James and Trelawny parishes.

Antiques and Artifacts

Greenwood houses a collection of beautiful antiquities from all over the world, brought to Jamaica by the Barretts. Among them are the family’s custom Wedgwood porcelain, fire-fighting equipment, oil paintings, maps, punch clock and a library of around 300 books that includes a first edition Dickens. Furnishings include a number of Victorian chaises, love seat, Spanish chandeliers and a rosewood inlaid piano made by Beethoven approved John Broadwood. There are desks with secret compartment to hide paperwork in case of potential pirate attack and a menacing mantrap used to capture escaping slaves. Most impressive, is the collection of old musical instruments that have been restored to working condition, including a polyphone and a wind up a barrel organ.

Greenwood Great House - Jamiaca's Best Kept Secret
The ballroom, now dining room
Greenwood Great House - Jamiaca's Best Kept Secret
Spanish chandeliers
Greenwood Great House - Jamiaca's Best Kept Secret
The Gold Room
Greenwood Great House - Jamiaca's Best Kept Secret
Barrel organ restored to working condition with boxes of "Country dances, songs and marches"
Greenwood Great House - Jamiaca's Best Kept Secret
Flemish chair
Greenwood Great House - Jamiaca's Best Kept Secret
Antique bottles found onsite
Greenwood Great House - Jamiaca's Best Kept Secret
The pink Room
Greenwood Great House - Jamiaca's Best Kept Secret
Victorian lounges
Greenwood Great House - Jamiaca's Best Kept Secret
Antique fire fighting equipment including leather buckets
Greenwood Great House - Jamiaca's Best Kept Secret
Greenwood Great House - Jamiaca's Best Kept Secret
Antique furniture including lovers seat designed to prevent legs touching
Greenwood Great House - Jamiaca's Best Kept Secret
Greenwood Great House - Jamiaca's Best Kept Secret
Greenwood's rear courtyard
Greenwood Great House - Jamiaca's Best Kept Secret
The former kitchen, now a bar named The Level Crossing

Resources for experiencing Greenwood

If you have an appreciation for history, architecture, antiques and/or interiors, then Greenwood Great House is an absolute must-do for your Jamaica itinerary. This great home may have a low profile, but I assure you it is no less great.

Peace, love & inspiring travels,

Madam ZoZo

Greenwood Great House - Jamiaca's Best Kept Secret
Greenwood Great House - Jamiaca's Best Kept Secret
Greenwood Great House, in the northwest of Jamaica, contains a museums-worth of furnishings and objets d'art to delight any history buff or interiors addict

About author

Madam ZoZo

Hi! I'm Madam ZoZo, aka Zoë, an Australian designer, creative consultant, blogger and digital nomad. I'm passionate about travel, design, dance and new experiences that fuel my creativity. I strive to travel in a style that is gentle on the earth and that contributes to the communities I visits, even if it is merely to take away a greater understanding of a different culture. Duende by Madam ZoZo, is where I share the stories of my travels and the duende (soul/inspiration) I find along the way.

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